Dr. Alice Boyle, Assistant Professor

Alice joined K-State in October 2012. She is Canadian, grew up in Winnipeg, did her undergraduate at the University of British Columbia, a PhD at the University of Arizona with Judie Bronstein and Courtney Conway, and post-docs at Western with Chris Guglielmo and at UBC with Kathy Martin. She followed a very non-traditional career path for a scientist, and is thrilled the path has led here.

Office: 307 Ackert Hall
Labs: 335 & 341 Ackert Hall
Phone: 785-532-1701
Email: ude.u1513018738sk@el1513018738yoba1513018738
Twitter: @birdfiddler

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Also check out the lab YouTube channel and Flickr account

Alice’s CV

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My background

I came to science round-about, getting into birding after moving to Costa Rica to play in the CR National Symphony fresh out of undergrad. Eventually, I did my PhD research on altitudinal migration in Costa Rica which set me firmly on a path of a tropical biologist, and I my interests continue down those tropical paths. However, I have also worked on fruit-frugivore interactions, high elevation birds and elevational gradients, Tree Swallows, and other miscellaneous topics. Since moving to Kansas, a major research focus has turned to grassland systems. These highly variable environments have shaped bird behavior and population dynamics in fascinating ways. Unfortunately, they are also highly threatened; my research addresses both basic and applied questions, particularly with sparrows. Read more about these projects and results of this work.

Lab philosophy

Mentorship is the best part of my job. I strive to create the circumstances and provide support necessary for each student to thrive, to be challenged, grow in intellectual independence and maturity, and to be respected and valued for who they are. People chose to go to grad school for diverse reasons; I support that diversity and I will celebrate successes of many types. I expect students to think hard hard, to collect good data, and to devote the time and effort to publish their work in a timely fashion. However, this does not mean I expect students to work all the time; maintaining a healthy work-life balance (and swing!) is critical. I expect students to communicate openly and honestly. From me, students should expect regular and substantial guidance, to receive prompt feedback on written work, and honest but respectful evaluation at all stages of your career. If you have the misfortune to experience harassment, discrimination, or disrespectful behavior in a professional setting, I will be your advocate in strict confidentiality.

Teaching and outreach

I regularly teach Ornithology (BIOL 543; lecture and lab) and have begun a hands-on Special Topics course in Field Ornithology (BIOL  697B), both taught during spring semester. As an undergraduate research mentor, I am an active contributor to our summer REU program and similar opportunities across campus (e.g., Developing Scholars and McNair programs). I believe that scientists today must work hard to reverse societal misconceptions about what we do and why we do it. Therefore, an integral part of my work and my approach to training is to communicate in diverse ways to broad audiences.

The rest

When I’m not working, I try to maintain sanity and make people happy by playing fiddle (and sometimes, viola or banjo). I play with the band STEAM!, and with Robert Rosenberg (guitar) and other musicians for dances and local shows. I love to contra-dance, hike, and wistfully remember the days when I went on long backcountry trips and traveled around Latin America, birding, botanizing, and snorkeling out of my VW bus.

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